From Generosity to Justice

Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipisicing elit. Architecto voluptatem, libero laborum numquam laudantium tempore, reprehenderit totam reiciendis ipsam sed odio explicabo vitae omnis fugiat eius provident repellendus, asperiores fugit? Nihil rerum molestiae tempore quaerat officia vero odio et, odit enim sed tempora neque. Veniam error adipisci quasi vel veritatis a laboriosam.


Thank you for providing your info.

You may now download the book using the links below:

Download the eBook

Download the audiobook

Thoughts on From Generosity to Justice

Carly Hare
Coalition Director of Change Philanthropy

“When we try to find other people’s solutions, we inevitably cause new problems. Our intent and our impact are simply misaligned. That’s why we have to be mindful to engage with the community. That’s the difference between approaching philanthropy from a charity mindset and approaching it with a justice mindset.”

Strive Masiyiwa
Founder and Chairman of Econet Wireless Group

“One of the things that I began to realize over the past 15 years is that you have to make your life philanthropy, in the sense that the greatest philanthropy doesn’t always involve money. In fact, when all you can use is money, you see its incredible limitations.”

Jeff Raikes
Co-Founder of the Raikes Foundation

“If I were to offer a piece of advice to other philanthropists, it would be to get, and understand, and make visible their own privilege—and to deal with their privilege so that they can be more self-aware in the aspirations they have for their philanthropy. If you don’t get comfortable with the idea that privilege is typically invisible to those of us who possess it, you’re not nearly as well equipped to make a difference for society.”

Elizabeth Alexander
President of The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation

“When we think about George Soros or Henry Ford or Andrew W. Mellon, they all amassed their wealth in different ways and they all have very different stories. But at the end of the day, the result is still an excess of wealth in one place. What we know is that there can’t be an excess in one place if there’s not a need in another place. So, I think, at the heart of philanthropy, there are inherently ideas about what wealth redistribution looks like.”

Carly Hare
Coalition Director of Change Philanthropy

“When we try to find other people’s solutions, we inevitably cause new problems. Our intent and our impact are simply misaligned. That’s why we have to be mindful to engage with the community. That’s the difference between approaching philanthropy from a charity mindset and approaching it with a justice mindset.”

Strive Masiyiwa
Founder and Chairman of Econet Wireless Group

“One of the things that I began to realize over the past 15 years is that you have to make your life philanthropy, in the sense that the greatest philanthropy doesn’t always involve money. In fact, when all you can use is money, you see its incredible limitations.”

Jeff Raikes
Co-Founder of the Raikes Foundation

“If I were to offer a piece of advice to other philanthropists, it would be to get, and understand, and make visible their own privilege—and to deal with their privilege so that they can be more self-aware in the aspirations they have for their philanthropy. If you don’t get comfortable with the idea that privilege is typically invisible to those of us who possess it, you’re not nearly as well equipped to make a difference for society.”

Elizabeth Alexander
President of The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation

“When we think about George Soros or Henry Ford or Andrew W. Mellon, they all amassed their wealth in different ways and they all have very different stories. But at the end of the day, the result is still an excess of wealth in one place. What we know is that there can’t be an excess in one place if there’s not a need in another place. So, I think, at the heart of philanthropy, there are inherently ideas about what wealth redistribution looks like.”